Monday, December 5, 2022

Russia-Ukraine war live: Putin ‘exacting vengeance’ for his military failures with latest strikes, says UK defence secretary | Ukraine

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Russia is ‘exacting vengeance’ for military failures with recent attacks, UK’s foreign secretary says

Russian president Vladimir Putin is “exacting vengeance” for his military failures through fresh strikes on Ukraine and the withdrawal from the Black Sea export deal, the UK’s foreign secretary has said.

James Cleverly has urged Russia to reconsider participating in the grain deal, adding it would be unconscionable for people to suffer because of Putin’s setbacks on the battlefield.

None of Russia’s recent attacks serve any military purpose, he added, describing Putin’s only aim as “spreading terror” across Ukraine.

“Putin will never break the spirit of the Ukrainian people,” the minister said.

Russia is ‘exacting vengeance’ for military failures with recent attacks, says Cleverly – video

Key events

The Ukrainian Association of Football (UAF) has called for Iran to be excluded from the 2022 Fifa World Cup.

Its executive committee filed the request citing Iran’s history of human rights violations, and the alleged involvement of Iran in Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

Russia has already been banned from the competition.

The World Cup begins on 20 November, and Iran’s first match is against England the following day.

If the country were to get banned from the competition, Ukraine could be called up as a replacement team after it initially failed to qualify.

A statement from the UAF reads:

The UAF Executive Committee decided, taking into account media information about systematic human rights violations in Iran, which may violate the principles and norms of the FIFA Statutes, taking into account the UN Security Council Resolution 2231 regarding the imposition of sanctions on Iran and the possible involvement of Iran in the military aggression of Russia against Ukraine, to make a request to the FIFA to consider excluding the Iranian national team from the 2022 FIFA World Cup.

Summary

It has just gone 7pm in Kyiv – here’s where thing stand.

  • A wave of Russian missiles struck hydroelectric plants and other critical energy and water infrastructure across Ukraine with explosions reported near the capital, and in at least 10 other regions this morning.

  • Russia says its troops struck military and energy infrastructure targets in “high precision strikes”, however Ukraine says its military facilities were not targeted, and it had shot down 44 out of 50 enemy rockets.

  • A Ukrainian energy company says it is running out of equipment to repair the damaged infrastructure. DTEK was able to buy some spare parts to fix the power lines but needs millions of dollars more to restore the network, its executive director said.

  • Putin is “exacting vengeance” for military failures through fresh strikes on Ukraine and the withdrawal from the Black Sea export deal, the UK’s foreign secretary says. James Cleverly urged Russia to reconsider participating in the grain deal, adding it would be unconscionable for people to suffer because of Putin’s setbacks on the battlefield.

  • France is working to allow Ukraine to export food supplies via land routes rather than by the Black Sea. After Russia withdrew from the crucial grain export deal over the weekend, France’s agriculture ministry said it was looking at transportation through Poland or Romania instead.

  • Meanwhile Turkey says it will continue its efforts to support the deal in an effort to “serve humanity”. The UN confirmed the first of 40 planned ship inspections had been completed in Istanbul waters on Monday, with a team of only UN and Turkish members, rather than the previous four-member teams including Russians and Ukrainians.

  • Russia dismisses reports that its agents hacked Liz Truss’s phone, and managed to gain access to sensitive information. When asked about the report, the Kremlin said there was little in British media that could be taken seriously:

  • Russia accuses Ukraine of undermining the Black Sea grain export deal following a drone attack on its fleet in Crimea. It argued the contract was now “hardly feasible” because the security of the shipment was unable to be guaranteed.

  • Norway put its military on a higher level of alert to sharpen its response to the war in Ukraine. The country will tighten its security from tomorrow weeks after it deployed its troops to guard offshore platforms and onshore facilities following the Nord Stream pipeline leak.

  • Russia announces its partial mobilisation, which had been used to send reinforcements into Ukraine, has ended. On 21 September, Putin announced a partial mobilisation – the first since the second world war – was a direct response to the dangers posed by the west.

Russia is ‘exacting vengeance’ for military failures with recent attacks, UK’s foreign secretary says

Russian president Vladimir Putin is “exacting vengeance” for his military failures through fresh strikes on Ukraine and the withdrawal from the Black Sea export deal, the UK’s foreign secretary has said.

James Cleverly has urged Russia to reconsider participating in the grain deal, adding it would be unconscionable for people to suffer because of Putin’s setbacks on the battlefield.

None of Russia’s recent attacks serve any military purpose, he added, describing Putin’s only aim as “spreading terror” across Ukraine.

“Putin will never break the spirit of the Ukrainian people,” the minister said.

Russia is ‘exacting vengeance’ for military failures with recent attacks, says Cleverly – video

A Ukrainian energy company has said it is running out of equipment to repair infrastructure damaged in Russian missile strikes.

DTEK was able to buy some spare parts to fix the power lines but needs millions of dollars more to restore the system after this morning’s attacks. One of its facilities sustained damage in the strike leading to severe power cuts across its network.

It executive director, Dmytro Sakharuk, said:

We have already used up the stockpiles of equipment which we had in our depots after the first two waves of attacks since 10 Oct.

Ukraine’s foreign ministry has criticised Russia’s decision to withdraw from the Black Sea grain export deal.

Spokesperson Oleg Nikolenko said the move would lead to millions of people across Africa and Asia facing the threat of malnutrition, adding: “Don’t let Russia starve the world.”

Global prices for wheat have increased by 5% following Russia’s suspension of the grain deal. Millions in Africa and Asia will face malnutrition and hunger because of Moscow’s cruelty. Ukraine wants to continue grain exports to those in need. Don’t let Russia starve the world.

— Oleg Nikolenko (@OlegNikolenko_) October 31, 2022

Large parts of Kyiv without water and electricity after missile strikes

A barrage of Russian missile strikes has left large parts of Kyiv without water and electricity, after the rockets targeted critical civilian infrastructure earlier on Monday.

Footage released by Ukraine’s armed forces also showed its air defences intercepting Russian missiles with the country’s air command stating it shot down 44 out of 50 rockets fired by Russia.

The wave of strikes came after a sea drone attack on the Admiral Makarov, a flagship Russian Black Sea vessel, according to an examination of video footage.

Russian missiles target Kyiv infrastructure leaving parts of city without water – video

Russian defence ministry: partial mobilisation is completed

Russia’s defence ministry has announced that the country’s partial mobilisation, which had been used to send reinforcements into Ukraine as part of what Russia terms a “special military operation”, has ended.

In a statement on behalf of the defence minister, Sergei Shoigu, the ministry said:

All activities related to conscription for military service by the military commissariats, together with the executive authorities of the constituent entities of the Russian Federation, of citizens in the reserve have been stopped.

Preparation and delivery of subpoenas are stopped.

Alert stations and headquarters, collection points for citizens of military commissariats, as well as buildings and structures allocated by decisions of the executive authorities of the constituent entities of the Russian Federation, used for partial mobilisation measures, are subject to release for functioning or use for their previous purpose.

Also, according to the instructions, all personnel of the military commissariats involved in ensuring partial mobilisation are ordered to return from 31 October of this year. to carry out their duties as usual.

In the future, the work of the military commissariats for recruiting the armed forces of the Russian Federation will be organised only by accepting volunteers and candidates for military service under the contract.

On 21 September, the Russian president, Vladimir Putin, announced a partial mobilisation in Russia as a significant escalation that placed the country’s people and economy on a wartime footing. In a highly anticipated televised address, Putin said Russia’s first mobilisation since the second world war was a direct response to the dangers posed by the west, which “wants to destroy our country”.

Shortly after Putin’s announcement, Shoigu said 300,000 Russians would be called up as part of the mobilisation, which would apply to “those with previous military experience”.

The prime minister of the Czech Republic has visited Ukraine, arriving in the capital shortly after it was struck by Russian missiles.

Petr Fiala shared a photo of himself and officials walking around Kyiv, and another shaking hands with the Ukrainian prime minister, Denys Shmyal.

“Ukrainians fight not only for their country, but for the whole of Europe. Our support must continue,” he tweeted.

Jsme v Kyjevě, který i dnes ráno čelil ruským raketovým útokům.

Čeká nás řada jednání s ukrajinskými přáteli. Věřím, že přinesou konkrétní výsledky.

Ukrajinci bojují nejen za svoji zemi, ale za celou Evropu. Naše podpora musí vytrvat. pic.twitter.com/drCtOIE693

— Petr Fiala (@P_Fiala) October 31, 2022

Srdečné přivítání s ukrajinským premiérem Denysem Šmyhalem. 🇨🇿🇺🇦

Na mezivládním jednání mluvíme o hospodářské spolupráci, národní a mezinárodní podpoře a o poválečné obnově Ukrajiny. pic.twitter.com/eDA4PVCINB

— Petr Fiala (@P_Fiala) October 31, 2022

The mayor of the Russian town of Labytnangi has shared photographs of local schoolchildren sewing clothing for soldiers fighting in Ukraine.

Marina Treskova said the pupils were sewing sets of clothes – including balaclavas and jumpers – for military personnel in “the special operation zone and training centres”.

Another update from the home front of the “special military operation”:

The mayor of Russia’s Labytnangi declares proudly on social media that after lessons, local schoolchildren have been sewing sets of clothing for soldiers fighting in Ukrainehttps://t.co/7tBqegVf7X pic.twitter.com/CFQENIP3ng

— Francis Scarr (@francis_scarr) October 31, 2022

Norway’s military will be put on a higher level of alert to sharpen its response to the war in Ukraine, its prime minister Jonas Gahr Støre has announced.

“This is the most severe situation in several decades. There are no indications that Russia is expanding its warfare to other countries, but the increased tensions make us more exposed to threats, intelligence operations, and influence campaigns,” he said.

The country will tighten its security from 1 November, weeks after it deployed its troops to guard offshore platforms and onshore facilities following the Nord Stream pipeline leak.

Amid the war, Norway has become the biggest exporter of natural gas to the European Union, accounting for about a quarter of the bloc’s imports.

Read more on the story here:

Russian troops struck military and energy infrastructure targets in “high precision strikes”, its defence ministry has said.

Ukraine announced a fresh wave of Russian missile attacks in major cities across the country, cutting off the water and power supply to residents.

“Russian armed forces continued strikes with high-precision long-range air and sea-based weapons against Ukraine’s military command and energy systems,” a statement from Russia’s defence ministry said. “The strike targets were achieved. All assigned objects have been hit.”

Ukraine said a number of missiles had been intercepted, but added Russia had targeted energy infrastructure and not its military facilities.



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